3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50
3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50
3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50
3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50
3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50
3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50
3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50
3 CORNER TICKET GOLD Junior Woe, F1 GRAND PRIX VON ÖSTERREICH € 344,50

DTM Anderstorp

Anderstorp - Anderstorp Raceway

14.06.2020
Ważne zawiadomienie: Organizacja parasolowa DTM ITR oficjalnie odłożyła DTM Anderstorp! Jesteśmy już w kontakcie z organizatorem, jak tylko pojawi się nowy termin, zasady zmiany rezerwacji lub jej anulowania, skontaktujemy się z Państwem drogą mailową. Uprzejmie prosimy o odrobinę cierpliwości.

DTM Anderstorp

14.06.2020 | Anderstorp - Anderstorp Raceway

Ważne zawiadomienie: Organizacja parasolowa DTM ITR oficjalnie odłożyła DTM Anderstorp! Jesteśmy już w kontakcie z organizatorem, jak tylko pojawi się nowy termin, zasady zmiany rezerwacji lub jej anulowania, skontaktujemy się z Państwem drogą mailową. Uprzejmie prosimy o odrobinę cierpliwości.


Business

Statistics:

Germany, Denmark, Norway, UK, Finland and the United States of America.



Economy:

Sweden boasts one of Europe's most advanced industrial economies and one of the highest standards of social welfare in the world. It is also the headquarters of a relatively large number of world-class multinational companies (Ericsson, Electrolux, ABB, AstraZeneca, IKEA, H&M and Volvo among them). A prolonged period of peace, which included a policy of neutrality during both World Wars, has contributed much to its economic development.

Well over half of the country is covered by forest, which supplies the raw material for the country’s wood-based industries (paper, wood pulp and finished products such as furniture), which account for 20% of Swedish material exports. The agricultural (mainly in the south) and fisheries sector is, however, fairly insignificant today, accounting for just 1.7% of GDP.

Sweden has a strong industrial sector that produces a number of major exports including machinery, vehicles, office and telecommunications equipment, iron and steel, wood products and chemicals. The country is rich in mineral resources, which include 15% of the world's known uranium deposits and large deposits of iron ore, copper, lead and zinc.

The annual GDP growth rate for 2017 was estimated to be 4%. This shows that Sweden has overcome the effects of the financial and economic crisis in Europe in recent years.



Business Etiquette:

Swedes pride themselves on their cooperative, egalitarian spirit in the workplace. In theory at least, issues of status and hierarchy are considered to be of far less importance than in many other countries, with the majority of people using their first names in the work place. Elaborate deference is definitely out of fashion and the management style, in a similar style to Swedish government practice, tends to be consensual rather than authoritarian.

Since Stockholm is the capital, the city sees itself as setting the tone and pace for the rest of the country. Nevertheless, however relaxed Swedes are about power and authority, they are strict timekeepers and punctuality is expected for both work and play. Businesspeople are expected to dress smartly, with suits being the norm, although more casual attire is favoured in industries such as IT, media and internet businesses - here you can generally get away with wearing jeans and a shirt. English is widely - and well - spoken in most circles. Business cards are commonly used.

Swedes also tend to go straight to the point; personal chat is generally put to one side until the real business is done and dusted. Most business socialising is done away from the home, at bars and restaurants. Dinners tend to be quite boozy affairs, although at lunches water is often substituted for alcohol. 'Afterwork' – written and pronounced in English – is the Swedish Happy Hour, and usually starts around 1600. City bars and restaurants fill with crowds who have finished work for the day, to drink beer, wine and cocktails.

People in Sweden work to live, they don't live to work. Summer vacations are usually four weeks or longer, and to accommodate their employees, entire offices and small companies may shut around July and August. At midsommar, the summer solstice that falls around the end of June, towns and cities will be abandoned as Swedes head to their cottages in the countryside.

Flexible working hours are a widespread practice with lunch between 1200 and 1300. Normal office hours are 0800-1600, usually with an earlier finish on Fridays. It's not uncommon for parents to leave daily at 1530, to pick up their children from daycare.



Business Contacts: Address: ,Brunnsgatan 2,Stockholm,SE-103 21

zamknij


gpticketshop.com uses cookies to offer you the best possible service. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the cookie usage.
Further information
OK